25 October 2010

wrock me like a hurricane (you know, the mixed drink?)

In a stroke of total crap, all the photos I took at the wizard rock show Friday night came out to be totally useless. So, I'm tossing you a few links to get the general idea, if you be interested.  The good news? While being deeply situated in nerddom and audience-specific in-jokes, the performers and the fans were so incredibly sweet and excited that it was almost impossible not to have fun. I'm not normally very comfortable in any kind of crowd (even if the crowd is, as was the case at this show, in a living room), but everyone was nice, and everyone was there to have fun. What I dislike and what bugs me out the most about seeing live music at small pubs and house shows is that noxious and obnoxious "look at me look at you" tension. I'm giddy to report that there's none of that bad noise at a wrock show.

Some of these acts would not normally be acoustic, I think, and I'd love to see all this over again at a real venue with much loudness and some electric implements of major ka-pow.

The performers were, as follows,

Armoured Bear Cub: Repping deep nerdcore with songs about everything from Buffy to John Green's young adult novel, Paper Towns. (Basically, this a side-project of Lauren Fairweather and Matt of The Whomping Willows... so, they were opening for themselves, I guess you could say.) My favorite: "Peeing In A Bottle"

Justin Finch-Fletchley and the Sugar Quills: The first real wrock act. Mr. Finch-Fletchley broke about 12 and half thousand e-strings, but was kind of adorable about it. I think I would've liked his set better electrickafied and with a full band, all things considered. The girls (and they are mostly girls at these wrock shows; as a side note, I'm sure I was the oldest one there) loved him. He was hocking some pretty hilarious "JFF is my BFF" pint cups at the merch table -- I wonder how many folks were old enough to drink.  My favorite: "Expelliarmus"

Lauren Fairweather: Lauren played songs from her other popular wrock act, the Moaning Myrtles, as well as songs about other geektropes and life--presumably life as a nerd--in college. I think it would be fairly accurate to say LF is the Melanie Safka of the wrock scene. My only itch here was with Lauren's "Post-Potter Depression" songs and merch. I get the parody and all, and it sure is catchy, but, you know, eh. It's a turd of a feeling to know that you're the only person in the audience who's suffered the illness being parodied (that's an assumption, I know, but I'm pretty sure I'm right about it). My favorite: I'm Going to Hogwarts

The Whomping Willows: Actually just one dude, Matt, who can write a bitchin wizard song. Plus, I mean, he was pretending to be the whomping willow. And his album is called Wizard Party Forever!!! Even my fairly hep cat little brother, who came with, found himself in the throes of many an unstoppable chortle. I enjoyed this particular shtick the most. My favorite: I Believe in Nargles (this video does not accurately encapsulate how excited the fans get about this, and every, song played)

Anyway, so, basically, this was a good time. A silly time, but a good one. Plus, lots of the proceeds for this tour go to pay for the health expenses incurred by the family of a fan who died of cancer. 

nly channels rita skeeter, rocks out; baby j is embarrassed by his mother 




On an utterly secondary side-note, the second sale at the shop happened tonight! I'm so dorked out I can barely stand it.


yours in albus,
nly

5 comments:

  1. Aawwww I'm so jealous - what a gorgeous little boy!!

    xx

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm really sorry if I've offended you accidentally. That song was not intending to be a parody at all. I would never parody any real illnesses... I was not intending to make fun or light of anyone's pain. Post-potter depression refers to the feeling that many potter fans experience upon finishing the book series that they spent the past decade with, knowing that they would never experience a first read of it again. I thought that it was self-explanatory, and if it wasn't, my introduction of the song at the show should have covered it. Now I feel really really awful. I'm so sorry that my good intentions of bringing together a group of people experiencing similar feelings about books has gone awry. I really hope that this hasn't made you feel like I've targeted or purposely isolated you in any way. :(

    Lauren

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for taking the time to comment, Lauren!

    I absolutely understand your intention with your songs and merch. I know that it's intended to be humorous, and that it wasn't coined with a mean spirit. That was never unclear to me, though I do think that it speaks a little bit about the limits of intention. That said, perhaps parody was too strong a word. It's more like wordplay: "post-Potter depression" sounds very similar to postpartum depression and I think it's pretty easy to make that connection. (Although admittedly much easier if you've experienced PPD.)

    At any rate, I certainly feel no ill will toward you whatsoever.

    Hope the tour is going well!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm really sorry if I've offended you accidentally. That song was not intending to be a parody at all. I would never parody any real illnesses... I was not intending to make fun or light of anyone's pain. Post-potter depression refers to the feeling that many potter fans experience upon finishing the book series that they spent the past decade with, knowing that they would never experience a first read of it again. I thought that it was self-explanatory, and if it wasn't, my introduction of the song at the show should have covered it. Now I feel really really awful. I'm so sorry that my good intentions of bringing together a group of people experiencing similar feelings about books has gone awry. I really hope that this hasn't made you feel like I've targeted or purposely isolated you in any way. :(

    Lauren

    ReplyDelete